Health Consequences of Natural Disasters: An Overview of Recent Literature on Floods

Authors

  • Jamshaid Iqbal Department of Environment and Energy Management, Institute of Business Management, Karachi
  • Hazor Bux Department of Environment and Energy Management, College of Business Management, Institute of Business Management, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan
  • Sundeep Sahitia Department of Health and Hospital Management, College of Business Management, Institute of Business Management, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32413/pjph.v13i4.1287

Keywords:

Disasters, Natural disasters, Manmade disasters, Health impacts of disasters, Health impacts of floods

Abstract

Disasters, whether arising from natural forces or human activities, engender substantial harm, loss, and, in severe cases, fatalities. The enduring repercussions extend across individuals, animals, societies, ecosystems, and geographical locations. The consequences of disasters on public health are particularly pronounced, manifesting in a spectrum of medical outcomes. This review delves into the specific impact of floods on distinct age groups, scrutinizing the varying vulnerabilities within each demographic. Infants, young children, teenagers, adults, and the elderly encounter distinctive challenges during and post-flood events, encompassing respiratory ailments, waterborne diseases, infections, hunger, physical injuries, and psychological disorders. Floods not only compromise healthcare services but also precipitate shortages in medication and suboptimal treatment. Health issues resulting from floods exhibit divergence among neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and older individuals. The susceptibility to physical injuries, infections, respiratory disorders, healthcare disruptions, mental health issues, malnutrition, and waterborne diseases varies with the unique vulnerabilities of each age group. Disruptions to routine life disproportionately impact children and adolescents, whereas infants and older individuals exhibit heightened susceptibility. Extreme flood events pose the potential for fatalities, with the risk contingent on both the severity of the flood and the age group affected. Older adults, newborns, and infants face a higher likelihood of mortality attributable to flood-related causes. Mitigating the adverse health effects of floods necessitates robust disaster planning, improved infrastructure, and targeted health interventions tailored to the age-related vulnerabilities of the population.

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Published

28-12-2023

How to Cite

Health Consequences of Natural Disasters: An Overview of Recent Literature on Floods. (2023). Pakistan Journal of Public Health, 13(4), 192-199. https://doi.org/10.32413/pjph.v13i4.1287