Assessment of Physical and Mental Health of Children Living in Orphanages in Islamabad- A Cross-Sectional Survey

Authors

  • Farah Aziz Fazaia Medical College
  • Hafsa Nasrullah Fazaia Medical College
  • Raabia Tayyab Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Zille Huma Mustehsan Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Iffat Noreen Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Haris Hannan Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Rimsha Fatima Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Furqan Nasir Fazaia Medical College
  • Maham Sherazi Fazaia Medical College
  • Nida Batool Fazaia Medical College

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32413/pjph.v13i2.1219

Keywords:

Orphans, orphanages, physical health, mental health

Abstract

Background: Childhood holds immense significance in shaping the physical, mental, and emotional growth of children. Orphaned children face heightened susceptibility to encountering various physical and mental health challenges, thereby depriving them of the opportunity to experience optimal well-being throughout their childhood and beyond. Pakistan is home to an estimated 4.6 million orphaned children, with the majority being under the age of 17. The objective of the study was to assess the mental and physical health of children living in orphanages of Islamabad and Rawalpindi.

Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on a sample of 110 children aged 7 to 18 years, living in orphanages of Rawalpindi and Islamabad to assess their physical and mental health. Anthropometric measurements were taken and the presence or absence of anxiety was determined by using the “Revised Children Manifest Anxiety Scale” (RCMAS) questionnaire.

Results: 50% of the study population was underweight based on their BMI, while 46.36% had normal weight and 1.82% were overweight or obese. Out of the 33 male participants, 20 were found to be underweight. The results of the RCMAS scoring revealed that 20.9% of the children had anxiety, with a higher prevalence among females as compared to males.

Conclusion: Prevalence of underweight was found to be higher among male orphans. Female orphans were more likely to experience anxiety and depression as compared to males.

Author Biographies

  • Hafsa Nasrullah, Fazaia Medical College

    Contribution to research: Data collection, data entry in spss, Discussion writing, final ppt making.

    Final year MBBS student at Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad 

  • Raabia Tayyab, Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan
    • Contribution to research: Data collection, Questionnaire making, data entry in spss, Final ppt making.
    • Final year MBBS student at Fazaia Medical College, Air University, E-9, Islamabad 
  • Zille Huma Mustehsan, Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Supervisor. Asssistant professor, Department of Community Medicine, Fazaia Medical College, Air University, E-9, Islamabad 

  • Iffat Noreen, Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Dmonstrator, Department of Community Medicine,

    Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad 

  • Haris Hannan, Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Final year MBBS student, Fazaia Medical College, Air University, Islamabad

  • Furqan Nasir, Fazaia Medical College

    Final year MBBS student, Fazaia Medical College, Islamabad 

  • Maham Sherazi, Fazaia Medical College

    House officer, Pakistan Airforce Hospital, E9, Islamabad

  • Nida Batool, Fazaia Medical College

    Demonstrator Department of Community Medicine, Fazaia Medical College, islamabad

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Published

30-06-2023

How to Cite

1.
Aziz FA, Nasrullah HN, Tayyab R, Mustehsan ZH, Noreen I, Hannan H, et al. Assessment of Physical and Mental Health of Children Living in Orphanages in Islamabad- A Cross-Sectional Survey. Pak J Public Health [Internet]. 2023 Jun. 30 [cited 2024 Jul. 21];13(2):88-93. Available from: https://pjph.org/pjph/article/view/1219