Antibiotic Resistance: KAP Study on Medical and Non-Medical Students of Lahore, Pakistan

Authors

  • Muhammad Talha Iqbal Final Year MBBS student, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Maryam Habib Ahmed Final Year MBBS student, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Naureen Omar Assistant Professor, Community Medicine, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Raza Ahmed Final Year MBBS student, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Fahad Final Year MBBS student, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Ali Final Year MBBS student, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Maryam Kaukab Final Year MBBS student, FMH College of Medicine and Dentistry, Lahore, Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32413/pjph.v10i1.504

Keywords:

Antibiotic, Resistance, medical students, Pakistan

Abstract

Background: Antibiotics are believed to be safe drugs implying unawareness of people regarding implications of their unchecked overuse, health care professionals being no exception attributed to their attitude and differential practices. Objective was to assess knowledge, attitude and practices regarding antibiotic resistance among medical and non-medical students.

Methods: Descriptive study was conducted in Lahore from March to August 2018. A total of 384 first and second year medical and bachelor students of Fatima Memorial medical college and Nur university were enrolled. Validated questionnaire adopted from WHO survey was used to interview students. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 23. Individual and institutional ethical considerations were fulfilled.

Results: Mean age was 19.89±1.4. 94 medical (49%) and 77 (40.1%) non-medical students claimed to have taken antibiotics in the previous month, 63.6% using a prescription, 76% buying from medical store. Majority 91.7% (176) medical students were aware of the term “Antibiotic Resistance” compared to 64.1% (123) non-medical. Antibiotics becomes less effective once resistance develops leading to difficulty in treatment of infections; medical 145(76%) and nonmedical 137 (71.4%). Commonest treated diseases sore throat 102(53.1%) medical and fever 89(46.4%) non-medical students. Antibiotic resistance is a global issue; 77.6% (149) medical and 75% (144) non-medical students.

Conclusion: Majority of students were aware of antibiotics and resistance developing against them with a minimal difference between medical and non-medical.

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Published

2020-10-26

How to Cite

Iqbal, M. T., Ahmed, M. H., Omar, N., Ahmed, M. R., Fahad, M., Ali, M., & Kaukab, M. (2020). Antibiotic Resistance: KAP Study on Medical and Non-Medical Students of Lahore, Pakistan . Pakistan Journal of Public Health, 10(1), 24-31. https://doi.org/10.32413/pjph.v10i1.504